Maxson Letter

Maxson Letter

   The following letter* was written by David Maxson 1838-1864 to his brother
Benjamin Maxson 1836-1918 on his way from point of enlistment to Chattanooga.

   Saturday, June 25, 1864 at New Albany, Indiany, Dear brother I take my pen In hand to let you know that I am well and hope you and family are the same. I remained in barracs at Fort Snelling till last Tuesday at four O’clock at two the same day was the first I knew that I was going away though it was no unwelcome news to me as I was uneasy at that place. We marched to St. Paul then took a steam boat and went down river till next day at hastings changed boats that night reached Leacross after dark stayed there till morning then took the oars to Chicago reaching there at tenn that night and had the first real good meal on the road.  The night we got to leacroes near dark two men going as substitutes fot a large bounty jumped off and got ashore and we have not heard from them since but we have paid dear for that job for since we have had a guard of twelve men with us and no liberties even to get water or food kept In a car crouded fool of men this hot weather two were sick and left at Chicago then from there down we find more friends to bring water to us In the cars but In Minn. and Wiss the folks used us as though we were slaves, fcm  Chicago first class cars to Lafayette ariving there that night stayed there 3 hours had some sleeping cars furnished then was on the way to this place till 3 this afternoon but to do justice I must say that the women and men of Lafayette were more friendly than any where else and nearest home the most severe In sencure and no respect was shown us at St. Paul in the least but the Minnesotan and Wisconsinean is behind at Chicago supper was serveed up by women of kind looks at least who volun- teered their services In our behalf at that place we left Lafayette amid cheers from men and children and the waving of flags bonnets Hankerchiefs hands etc by women gathered there at every corner and yard and some doors where the people gathered to cheer us as we passed by and we cheered them till we needed our throata new tinned and that against orders of our guard and corporal, We started 104 strong beside the guard or 106 I cannot find out which,  two ran away two left sick at Chicago and four are reported slok here now.  The men are hard working men with few exceptions and good men to be with. just now an axident happened a guard on second floor took his line as it stood against the wall near a stove took it up the hammer caught the stove pooled back did not catch the rifle went off the ball passing through the third and forth floors on which soldiers were standing hurt no one but came near a number came near one man’s head so near that It made him sick for a minute.  So good bye for now this from D. M. your brother in good stirits.

*In copying this no attempt has been made to correct mistakes.

Asa Chandler Maxson
      1875-1980